Goliath hohner 2509
#11
Hello, Markosz.

The dominant 7th chord of any major scale (so, ti, re, flatted fa),
is the second most important chord, after the tonic chord (do, mi, so).

Don't confuse it with the diminished 7th ("diminant 7th")chord
(ti, re, fa, la).

The dominant 7th chord (sometimes labeled V7) serves as a
turn-around chord, to send the listener back to the tonic chord
(sometimes labeled I, the "home" chord).

The dom.7th chord may be preceded by the subtonic chord
(sometimes labeled ii), for a minor chord starting at "re": re, fa, la.

On a Richter system tremolo, the dominant 7th chord is an inhale chord.

JB
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#12
I have a Seydel Sailor Steel Reed that is Richter system, 24 notes, and starts on the tonic note. It is in G. They make other keys and I do not know if they also start on the tonic.

Here is a video I made about the dominate 7th chord on the Asian system. You can't get the complete chord on that harp.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAVtbFYa...FT&index=7
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#13
Heart 
John Rex I just like to say Thank you very very much
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#14
Hello
Today I found note layout in my old notebook looks like John said buy the way I purchased this Goliath from women in Massachusetts

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#15
Hello everyone
Rex I like to take time and say thank you for this video but I like to ask everyone to contribute in discussing chords
II .lll VI VII thank you
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#16
(08-12-2016, 12:33 AM)markosz Wrote: Hello everyone
Rex I like to take time and say thank you for this video  but I like to ask  everyone to contribute in discussing  chords
II .lll VI VII  thank you
You are welcome, Markosz.

ii and vi chords are usually minors and thus represented by small letters. The tremolo is good for folk music and other tunes that use a simple accompaniment. Complex chord progressions are best done on guitars or keyboards in my opinion. Harmonicas have limited chord capabilities. There are chord harmonicas.
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#17
Thank you
Yes I understand that harmonica is very limited but can we go at least through key of C and find this chords where are they are they available on Asian tremolo or Richter how and where use them
You see I never heard about II chord or VII chord always one four five
Will be nice to find out more thx
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#18
(08-12-2016, 05:43 AM)markosz Wrote: Thank you
Yes I understand that harmonica is very limited but can we go at least through key of C and find this chords  where are they  are they available on Asian tremolo or Richter how and where use them
You see  I never heard about II chord or VII chord always one four five
Will be nice to find out more  thx

Roman numerals indicate the degree of the scale that the root of the chord starts on. The root note of a IV chord in the key of C would be F. (1234 CDEF) I have never used a chord with a root on the seventh. That is what VII would suggest. That would be a B major chord in the key of C. Not used in any folk music or hymns that I know.
Perhaps you mean 7th chords. Those are common. IM7 would be a C Major 7 in the key of C. V7 would be a G Dominant 7 chord in the key of C. Both of those chords are common and useful. A dominant 7 is a major chord with a flatted 7th. G7 would be GBDF. GM7 would be GBDF#. In that last chord the F# is not flatted (all Fs are sharp in G). 7th chords are popular in blues and Country music.
Jazz uses chords like iim7 (in the key of C that would be a D minor 7th) which would be a colorful substitute for a IV chord. I don´t think the tremolo harmonica is best for jazz but I am sure somebody can play jazz on it. Bluegrass sometimes uses the II chord (D major chord in the key of C) as a passing chord but it is never held long.
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#19
In the key of C, the regular (unaltered) chord starting
on the "ti" note of the scale (B D F) is not a major
chord.

It's a diminished chord, or a diminished 7th chord
(B D F A). It would be, in Roman numerals, the vii
or vii7. Small Roman numerals indicate a minor 3rd
interval (distance) between the first two chord notes.

In the key of C, a B major chord would be an altered
chord, using chord notes not in the C major scale:

VII (large Roman numerals) = B D# F#;
a B major 7th (B D# F# A).

The vii or vii7 (diminished) chords are not common
in folk or country music, but are used in classical and
jazz music.

The VII or VII7 (altered major "ti" chords) are unknown
to me, as replacements for diminished chords.

JB
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#20
Yesterday I pick up my Goliath this is most beautiful tremolo harmonica with nice worm tones nice tremolo effects on low and high range this is great harmonica
Layout same as Big Valley page 41 top Phil Duncan book
Starts on E mi
I bought this harmonica for 30$ on ebay this harmonica is almost brand new this is lifetime deal
Another thing is I start to understand Richter adventage combination of scale and chords I don't know how much is new Goliath but most likely I cudnt a for it

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