Suzuki Fanfare
#31
(11-05-2016, 12:46 AM)Rex Wrote: Joe, Google "youtube seydel fanfare". I just did and there were 7 videos featuring that harp in various keys. That should give you an idea of the sound.
Also contact Greg Jones at http://www.1623customharmonicas.com/
He is a Seydel rep. I bought my Seydel Sailor steel reed tremolo from him. I seem to remember him telling me he had sold quite a few of the Fanfares to Irish music players. He should be able to answer your questions or put you in touch with somebody who can.
If I was a chromatic player then the Fanfare would make perfect sense to me. I came to tremolo from diatonic and had already invested in Suzuki Hummings and such and learned to play them before the Fanfare came out so I won't be switching to it.
Dezzy is correct in that hitting a single note is really not that hard because the notes on either side of any note sound in a different breath direction. I discuss hitting single notes in my first two instruction videos:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...8fQ_ap6sFT

If you get a Fanfare please give us a review and maybe some sound samples.
Thanks Rex, as always. I'll check out the Seydel site for the clips. And, I'll check your videos (I thought I had watched them all) for your lesson on this. If I have watched it I'm sure I need a refresher.

Joe
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#32
Joe, as a 50+ tongue blocker you know the tongue is important to playing. But I also like to pucker on a Tremlo and play extra notes even though they are not a true chord. I like to tongue block and vamp . It all adds to sound and except for musicians an audience doesn't know , it only hears the effect.
Yes I also tab a song from music to translate hole positions for different harmonicas and to change keys. A lot of forum writers condemn Tabs but I find them a quicker way to start a strange song. Yes I know, tabs don't give rhythm , but if we have the music or have heard the song it's no problem.
Joe, buying a collection of harmonicas for better sound does not make one a better player. Only practice does that. Get out your Tremlo and swing it.
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#33
(11-06-2016, 12:06 AM)dezzy Wrote: Joe, as a 50+ tongue blocker you know the tongue is important to playing. But I also like to pucker on a Tremlo and play extra notes even though they are not a true chord. I like to tongue block and vamp . It all adds to sound and except for musicians an audience doesn't know , it only hears the effect.
Yes I also tab a song from music to translate hole positions for different harmonicas and to change keys. A lot of forum writers condemn Tabs but I find them a quicker way to start a strange song. Yes I know, tabs don't give rhythm , but if we have the music or have heard the song it's no problem.
Joe, buying a collection of harmonicas for better sound does not make one a better player.  Only practice does that. Get out your Tremlo and swing it.

Good advice dezzy, and thanks. I agree on tabbing--I don't see it as a crutch-- it's the time when I thoroughly analyze the song.  I'm listening at this moment to the Finnish Folk Songs album that drbekken posted in the Your Audio and Video section, and each song has tongue vamps that are fully effective as rhythmic accents even if the notes played aren't the exact chord that would ordinarily go there. When done well, it doesn't matter if the chord is correct. As to a collection, I have two tremolos, a Hohner Echo 48 and a Hohner Weekender, different in about every way: note layout, mouthpiece feel, and tremolo response. They present enough of a challenge to keep me interested for the foreseeable future. As with most things in my musical life, what I need is more practice.
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#34
Well here it is a couple of months since my last post, and I cobbled together enough gift cards over Christmas to land myself the the Seydel Fanfare S. When I was here last I got helpful comments from several of you, including Rex and dezzy, about practice and characteristics of tremolos in general. My interest in the chromatic style mouthpiece and solo tuning was rewarded by a very satisfying playing experience in which the instrument was highly responsive and my playing was accurate. I'm working it into my play/practice routine and look forward to using it. Interestingly enough, taking to heart the comments from other posters, my most intensive play and practice is likely to be on my Hohner Weekender and Echo 48 harmonicas. I just got the Fanfare this week so in the months since my last post, the Hohners have been where I've spent my practice time. I've become more comfortable with them and am playing them better. Also, so much of the folk/traditional repertoire I'm playing on tremolo sounds better with the chords available with a Richter layout. For that reason, I expect to continue the use of traditional tremolo layout harps for most of my own playing, enjoying the Fanfare as a different sort of instrument.

I admit to no experience with Seydel harmonicas before this. I was aware of the company's reputation and broad appeal of its harmonicas among enthusiasts, but I'd never seen one, let alone played one.  My interest in the Fanfare, as I stated previously, was curiosity about the mouthpiece and solo tuning. The build quality, mouthpiece comfort, overall response, and tremolo response exceeded all my expectations. It is truly an amazing instrument.
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#35
Hi Joe. The Fanfare will not be a problem for you as I believe you understand music and not a beginner. Anyone with a tuner, and most seem to get one, can just Blow/Draw in every hole and write down the notes for all the holes. Don't have to worry about not having a printed chart. Once the position of the notes are found it is just a matter of transposing the music note and practice until muscle memory takes over. I feel some beginners are too technical and get scared to just Blow/Draw and make music. Time to get technical later. I agree that vamping even when it's not a true chord makes music more melodious to an audience, even if teachers shudder. Another point I believe is to play your own interpretation of a piece. Slow or fast in certain sections, soft or loud in other sections. You violate the songwriter's effort, but you put your own soul into the music. Perhap I'm a nut but that's what I enjoy.
Perhaps don't vamp when playing a solo with a pianist. !!
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