Suzuki Fanfare
#21
Hello Markosz and Rex.

This is getting off the subject of the Seydel Fanfare.

I was going to ask Rex about changing a Hohner #263 Chromatica glissando harp to a tremolo harp.
On the #263, each 2 vertically-paired holes play the same pitch, one exhale and the other inhale.

Then, I remembered the Hohner Polyphonia #6 is an antique tremolo glissando harp. It's not made today,
but I have one.

Now, I can play "the Pink Panther Theme" on a glissando tremolo harp. And, Lara's Theme" from the movie,
Dr. Zhivago.

Never mind.

John Broecker
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#22
(01-20-2015, 12:08 PM)john_broecker Wrote: Hello Markosz and Rex.

This is getting off the subject of the Seydel Fanfare.

I was going to ask Rex about changing a Hohner #263 Chromatica glissando harp to a tremolo harp.
On the #263, each 2 vertically-paired holes play the same pitch, one exhale and the other inhale.

Then, I remembered the Hohner Polyphonia #6 is an antique tremolo glissando harp. It's not made today,
but I have one.

Now, I can play "the Pink Panther Theme" on a glissando tremolo harp. And, Lara's Theme" from the movie,
Dr. Zhivago.

Never mind.

John Broecker


Well John, I do believe I have detected a rather humorous streak. Funny.
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#23
Hi Markosz. That's not my tuner. I just happened to find it online and it helps me tune. Thanks for the kind comments about my videos. I just made another one about chords. I think I am about out of the video business. I don't have much more to say and once people reach a certain level of proficiency they start to figure things out on their own and develop their own style.
John, I don't know what a #263 or a #6 is. I don't even know what a glissando harp is.
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#24
John, I don't know what a #263 or a #6 is. I don't even know what a glissando harp is.
[/quote]

Hello, Rex.

A Hohner #263 Chromatica is a chromatic harmonica with no slide mechanism. It's a double reed instrument, with both horizontal reed plates
having paired vertical reeds, tuned to the same pitch. It's not a tremolo. The top horizontal reed plate is exhale, with the bottom horizontal
reed plate as an inhale reed plate.

||G|G#|A|A#|B|C|C#|D|D#|E|F|F#|G|G#|A|A#|B|C|C#|D|D#|E|F|G|G#|A|A#|B|C|C#|D|D#|E|F|| (Top plate-exhale)
||G|G#|A|A#|B|C|C#|D|D#|E|F|F#|G|G#|A|A#|B|C|C#|D|D#|E|F|G|G#|A|A#|B|C|C#|D|D#|E|F|| (Bottom plate-inhale)

It's reed placement classifies it as a glissando instrument, range G3-F6, one step lower than 3 octaves range.

The Hohner Polyphonia #6 is another glissando no-slide chromatic instrument, but only has 2 compete octaves, G3-G5. The first vertically
stacked pair of holes are exhale, the second vertical pair are inhale, etc., through the entire range. This one is a glissando tremolo harp.
In this chart, the large letters are exhale, the small letters are inhale reeds:

||G|g#|A|a#|B|c|C#|d|D#|e|F|f#|G|g#|A|a#|B|c|C#|d|D#|e|F|f#|G|| (Top reed plate)
||G|g#|A|a#|B|c|C#|d|D#|e|F|f#|G|g#|A|a#|B|c|C#|d|D#|e|F|f#|G|| (bottom reed plate)

The Polyphonia #6 is not made today, but the #263 Chromatica is still being produced by Hohner.

Best Regards

John Broecker
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#25
John, it's okay to get off the subject. I decided against a Fanfare. I am of the believe that even though it is a tremolo, it still will be like playing a regular 10 hole harmonica. You blow and draw in the same hole. Today I ordered a Hering Vencedora 64 in the keys of A & E.
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#26
John, I play Lara's Theme as Somewhere my Love at a singalong, and lots of them join in singing. So it is still popular.
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#27
As a newbie to the site and to the tremolo, I was plowing through older threads to see what was discussed.  When I saw this topic, of favorite tremolos, I hoped the Seydel Fanfare would be mentioned. Sure enough here it is at the end. There's a good discussion of this harp on this thread but, particularly on reeds and solo tuning. However no one mentioned directly on the one thing that stood out to me when viewing the harp at the Seydel site: the mouthpiece. The thing that makes tremolo most difficult to practice and play, for me at least, is the embouchure required to manage a four-hole block of notes. It's a primary source of mistakes for me, even when I'm paying close attention to where I think I am. The fanfare has a chromatic-style mouthpiece, so each hole has four reeds. I play chromatic, so solo tuning and the larger-holed mouthpiece would not be a big switch. I wish I'd been aware of this model when I jumped in (ok, it is more expensive than the harps I got). If I had I'd be enjoying the tremolo experience and have considerably more playing accuracy. 

I know nothing else about this harmonica. I don't know about the intensity of the tremolo effect, or even how steel reeds sound. But I must say the mouthpiece is appealing. Did any of you choose this harp because of the mouthpiece? Is it well received among posters here? Well liked?
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#28
Joe, you should be able to block all the holes to the left of the melody note on a tremlo. Just dab all your tongue down. That is if you play with tounge blocking. If you play pucker then it could be a problem, but each side of the melody note the hole is usually a different blow or draw so there is some leniency. Just move further for the next note. Joe, actually playing a Tremlo is just like any other in as much as you find the notes and then practice and eventually muscle memory takes over and the notes are hit every time. Just a bit tricky going back to the chromatic when you don't have to move between blow and draw. I find nothing difficult switching between types. If you practice a song on any type it becomes natural.
As for intensity there is a lot of of discussion over the tremlo effect being wet or dry. That's a lot of tremlo or less tremlo. Which is about tuning between reeds of same note. Others can advise you here. Same with steel reeds . Some say they hear a different sound. I chose the Tremlo for the sound being different from Diatonics and chromatics. To play a solo with some backing I'd chose the chromatic. But I'd use the Tremlo if alone and vamp on it.
Joe ,of course it is well liked among posters here -- It's A Tremlo forum. That's just what I think.
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#29
Joe, Google "youtube seydel fanfare". I just did and there were 7 videos featuring that harp in various keys. That should give you an idea of the sound.
Also contact Greg Jones at http://www.1623customharmonicas.com/
He is a Seydel rep. I bought my Seydel Sailor steel reed tremolo from him. I seem to remember him telling me he had sold quite a few of the Fanfares to Irish music players. He should be able to answer your questions or put you in touch with somebody who can.
If I was a chromatic player then the Fanfare would make perfect sense to me. I came to tremolo from diatonic and had already invested in Suzuki Hummings and such and learned to play them before the Fanfare came out so I won't be switching to it.
Dezzy is correct in that hitting a single note is really not that hard because the notes on either side of any note sound in a different breath direction. I discuss hitting single notes in my first two instruction videos:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...8fQ_ap6sFT

If you get a Fanfare please give us a review and maybe some sound samples.
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#30
(11-04-2016, 04:42 AM)dezzy Wrote: Joe, you should be able to block all the holes to the left of the melody note on a tremlo. Just dab all your tongue down. That is if you  play with tounge blocking. If you play pucker then it could be a problem, but each side of the melody note the hole is usually a different blow or draw so there is some leniency. Just move further for the next note.  Joe, actually playing a Tremlo is just like any other in as much as you find the notes and then practice and eventually muscle memory takes over and the notes are hit every time. Just a bit tricky going back to the chromatic when you don't have to move between blow and draw. I find nothing difficult switching between types. If you practice a song on any type it becomes natural.
As for intensity there is a lot of of discussion over the tremlo effect being wet or dry. That's a lot of tremlo or less tremlo. Which is about tuning between reeds of same note. Others can advise you here. Same with steel reeds . Some say they hear a different sound. I chose the Tremlo for the sound being different from Diatonics and chromatics. To play a solo with some backing I'd chose the chromatic. But I'd use the Tremlo if alone and vamp on it.
Joe ,of course it is well liked among posters here -- It's A Tremlo forum. That's just what I think.

Thanks for the reply, dezzy. I am a tongue blocker, for 50+ years, and I agree, that what I need is more practice on the tremolo. I read one comment that the tremolo should be easier to tongue block because the target area is  more forgiving, with (up to) four hole to leave exposed instead of one. Sometimes when I play I'm fully confident I'll get the note I want when I blow or draw. Other times I shift slightly right or left to be more sure I will. This is further complicated by the alternate hole group numbering scheme for the lower the lower octave scale suggested by Phil Duncan for the Asian tuned (Hohner Weekender), wherein the higher note in the group is on the left side of the group until you get the middle octave. I often tab out a song when first learning it, and when I did so for the Weekender, before I saw Duncan's logic, I tabbed it with four note groupings with actual numbers. It was awkward to see those numbers on paper and associate them with the notes. Once I've learned a song I usually don't use the tab anymore, anyway, so it doesn't matter. 

This is a long way of saying, I have more work to do with the tremolo. However, I return to my original point about the Fanfare mouthpiece. I believe for many, particularly those who accept solo tuning on a trem, it makes the tremolo experience immediately accessible and easy (-er) to play. I'm fascinated. 
Thanks,
Joe

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