Suzuki Fanfare
#11
Hi Terryg
you can make special order and order Asian tuning on fanfare or Richter tuning
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#12
Hello, Terry.

Try whatever type and size of harmonica that you want. It's the only sure way to discover what's best for you.

I've tried basses, chord harps, glissando harps, Hohner Chordomonica 2, slide chromatics, no-slide chromatics,
un-valved chromatics, single reed diatonics, double reed tremolos, double reed octave harps, triple-reed Hohner
XB-40s, mini-harps.

But I have no interest in trying the Hohner Harmonetta, an antique harmonica not made today. It was invented
by Walt Muller, a friend of Larry Adler, who couldn't listen to Adler's "vamping" on a Hohner #270 slide chromatic
harmonica. Adler was vamping, (playing accompaniment chords for rhythmic effect) that didn't fit the harmony of
the melody.

Muller invented the Harmonetta for Hohner, while laid up in a hospital. The Harmonetta is a 3-octave melody-chord
chromatic, able to play all chords based on the chromatic (12-note) scale.

It was a button (not slide button) harmonica. The Harmonetta is held parallel to the floor, and it has a computer-like
set of chord or melody note press buttons. It was never a popular harmonica (it was one of the first with steel reeds),
and was patented in 1947.

The Harmonetta was an entirely new way to play a chromatic-chord harp, which made it difficult to learn. Also,
maintenance of the Harmonetta was beyond the skills of most harp repair technicians. Only a handful of people
in the world could successfully maintain and re-tune a Harmonetta. It was produced by Hohner from circa 1950-
circa 1980.

Best Regards

John Broecker
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#13
(01-19-2015, 06:06 PM)markosz Wrote: Hi Terryg
you can make special order and order Asian tuning on fanfare or Richter tuning


markosz. Thanks for the suggestion, but I would only want solo tuning. I am the happiest when playing my Mountain 80, which has solo reed placement. I just love it.
Reply
#14
(01-19-2015, 06:09 PM)john_broecker Wrote: Hello, Terry.

Try whatever type and size of harmonica that you want. It's the only sure way to discover what's best for you.

I've tried basses, chord harps, glissando harps, Hohner Chordomonica 2, slide chromatics, no-slide chromatics,
un-valved chromatics, single reed diatonics, double reed tremolos, double reed octave harps, triple-reed Hohner
XB-40s, mini-harps.

But I have no interest in trying the Hohner Harmonetta, an antique harmonica not made today. It was invented
by Walt Muller, a friend of Larry Adler, who couldn't listen to Adler's "vamping" on a Hohner #270 slide chromatic
harmonica. Adler was vamping, (playing accompaniment chords for rhythmic effect) that didn't fit the harmony of
the melody.

Muller invented the Harmonetta for Hohner, while laid up in a hospital. The Harmonetta is a 3-octave melody-chord
chromatic, able to play all chords based on the chromatic (12-note) scale.

It was a button (not slide button) harmonica. The Harmonetta is held parallel to the floor, and it has a computer-like
set of chord or melody note press buttons. It was never a popular harmonica (it was one of the first with steel reeds),
and was patented in 1947.  

The Harmonetta was an entirely new way to play a chromatic-chord harp, which made it difficult to learn. Also,
maintenance of the Harmonetta was beyond the skills of most harp repair technicians. Only a handful of people
in the world could successfully maintain and re-tune a Harmonetta. It was produced by Hohner from circa 1950-
circa 1980.

Best Regards

John Broecker


Interesting harmonica the Harmonetta. Maybe kind of like the Edsel?

Am I missing something John? Is there something magical about a chromatic harp without the slide? When it doesn't have the slide, then wouldn't it just be another 10 hole diatonic harmoncia? After all, isn't the slide just for changing keys at anytime in a song?

I am wondering if the Fanfare is a tremolo that's for playing single notes only, tongue blocking and lip blocking. Not useful for chord style playing.

I'm thinking the Fanfare will be more like playing (except with the tremolo sound) a Suzuki Promaster 10 hole diatonic, than the Seydel Mountain 80.
Reply
#15
Hello, Terry.

There is nothing magical about playing a no-slide chromatic, unless the performer adds it. No-slide chromatics include the Suzuki Soprano Single,
Alto Single; Hohner #263 Chromatica glissando harp, antiques Polyphonia #5,6,7; Tombo S-50,1190,1180,1142,1577, other Chinese
brands (Golden Cup, etc.); and standard circular shaped pitch pipes. Most no-slide chromatics are single reed instruments, but 2-deck bass
harps are also no-slide chromatics, octave-tuned (2 reeds per note).

A slide on a slide chromatic is used to change keys, but it also has the function of a breath saver, on the do and fa notes of the slide chromatic's stamped key. On a C chromatic slider, that's duplicate C and F notes and C#-F# notes. By using the slider, we change from a C exhale or C# slide out to a C (B#) slide in, inhale note. The same idea works in reverse on the F and F# notes- going from an inhale F or F# to an exhale F (E#)
or F# (Gb) with the slide in: a change in breath pattern saves our breath in long musical passages.

The Seydel Fanfare harp has, like other solo system harmonicas, very few factory-installed chords. It is designed to be played as a single-note
melody (one note at a time) instrument. It's not useful for chord playing. The Seydel Fanfare is a diatonic (one major scale only) tremolo.

The Fanfare is like playing any other solo system double reed harmonica: Huang Musette or Seydel Mountain Harp, or solo system single reed diatonics: Hering Master Solo, Hohner Marine Band #364-S, Huang Cadet Soliost. The Suzuki Promaster is a Richter system harmonica. It has a different reed placement than a Fanfare. The techniques used to play a Richter system harp are the same techniques used to play a solo system harp, but the solo system has all of the major scale notes, and the Richter has a few missing scale notes.

John Broecker
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#16
Thanks John. Thank you for taking your valuable time to explain things to me. If it is as easy to play as the Mountain 80, and the sounds are anywhere close to being as true, then I want me one of these in the key of D.

Have a great night!

Terry
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#17
Hi everyone
since Seydel is first company that alows alternative tunings I thing we should discuss in future bebop and spiral tuning .tremolo modification and maintenance specialy wind savers .comb .reeds using hromatic tuner thing like this thank you all
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#18
(01-19-2015, 11:11 PM)markosz Wrote: Hi everyone
since Seydel is first company  that alows alternative  tunings  I thing we should  discuss in future bebop and spiral tuning  .tremolo  modification and maintenance specialy wind savers .comb .reeds using hromatic  tuner thing like this thank you all


And hi back at you Markosz

Just hang on our new friend, there are several of your friends here who will be more than happy to offer up their knowledge of many subjects concerning tremolo. If you have something specific in mind, just create a thread where you see appropriate and see what happens. If it's in the wrong place our friend Jonathan will move it to the correct spot.

Please be aware Markosz, my best talent at this point in my career is to offer encouragement. "A man has to know his limitations." (Clint Eastwood}
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#19
Spiral is one of several tunings designed to play in second position. Diatonic players like second position because the bends are very useful notes. Most people do not bend on the tremolo. I have tried it per the instructions on Pat Missin's site and it works fine for me but you do loose the tremolo effect. I see no advantage to a tremolo designed to play in second, but I could be overlooking something. Bebop would give you two keys to play in (C and F on a C harp) but those keys would be different patterns. With either tuning you loose the tonic blow chord that is usually found all the way across any tremolo.
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#20
Hi Rex thank you for respond and shering information
I like to thank you for YouTube videos and your online tuner in future I like to check my weekender and your info will be very helpful I order book about tremolo there is chapter on tremolo modification I hope I will be able to make 15$ tremolo and make playeble responsive instrument I like to go under hood and check myself and learn thx
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