Suzuki Fanfare
#1
John, I am directing this question to you, since you helped me with the Mountain 80, however, if anyone else wants to chip in then please, by all means do.

The Suzuki Fanfare. I am looking for the reed layout of this harp. I have noticed that you have mentioned this harp on several occasions, so I figure you might know.

I did find some info on Pat Mussin's site, but I need some clarity. It appears to me, unlike the Mountain 80 where at the beginning of the middle octave, you have a blow hole, then to the right you have a draw hole, 4 holes in all. On the Fanfare it appears there is a blow hole on top, and right below a draw hole, a set of two instead of a set of four. In other words, just like a 10 hole diatonic, you blow and draw on the same hole, except with the tremolo effect.

If you can make sense of my description, please tell me if I am right or very wrong.

Thank You,
Terry
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#2
Hello, Terry.

According to the 2014 Seydel catalog:

The Seydel Fanfare is available in three models: the #23480-S has a transparent blue acrylic comb and stainless steel reeds.
The #22480 has brass reeds and a transparent brown acrylic comb. Both harps are solo system, 12 holes, and both are valved.

Both have a mouthpiece of metal, chrome-plated; and "German Silver" reed plates, 1 millimeter thick. German silver is not real silver.

Both harps use the standard solo system reed placement used on standard slide chromatic harmonicas. the reed placement is the same
for all 3 diatonic octaves; The weight is 6.7 ounces (190 grams) for all of the Fanfare harps.

||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|| * (OR, it may beSmile ||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|| (repeat)

* The catalog shows the reed placement as the first one listed above; and the Mountain Harp listed as the second chart above.

(repeats for two more octaves. the large letters (C,E,G) are exhale; and the small letters (d,f,a,b) are inhale reeds.)

The #23480-S is available in the keys of G,A,C and D.

The #22480 is available in the keys of G,A,Bb,C and D.

Your description of the note chart is correct, but it may be easier to see each reed in it's own hole, as tremolos are set.
See the note charts, above.

There is also a special order Fanfare, #22480-SP. It has the same description as the #22480, but you can make a special order for
any reed placement system, any scale. See the "Harp Configurator" page of the Seydel website:

http://www.seydelusa.com

Best Regards

John Broecker
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#3
Hi John,

Old hardhead back again. So, going by your chart, the notes are laid out horizontal, not two holes diagonal. The first hole of the Octave, a C, would be a blow hole. The next hole to the right, a D, would be a draw. Right? Or is it blow draw on the same hole. It seems to me it would have to be that way to get three full octaves in on a 12 hole harmonica.

I am wondering if the Fanfare has anywhere as much tremolo as the Mountain 80. Wetter as I understand.

John, I hate to be a pest, but I really need to get this one right.

Best to you,
Terry
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#4
Hi Terryg
yes you are right blow and drow in one air hole
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#5
The Fanfare is made by Seydel, not Suzuki. It is basically their chromatic harmonica but instead of having the bottom reed plate tuned half a step above the top (like a chromatic) they tune it to the same note but with just a bit of offset to give a tremolo effect. On the chromatic you select which reed to play by using the slide (for instance C or C#). There is no slide on the Fanfare. Both reeds play at the same time. Like a chromatic, this harmonica has valves. I don't like valves because they make the harmonica harder to clean in my opinion. They are also one more thing that needs maintenance once in a while. Warming up a valved harp before playing is highly recommended. Since it has the same comb and covers as their chromatic I wonder if the tone is similar to a chromatic with tremolo added. I have not played one. I owned one chromatic and didn't really care too much for it. The Fanfare would be the same size as a chromatic and the mouth piece would be the same. The note layout is the same as a solo tuned chromatic. If you like to play chromatic then the Fanfare is probably right up your alley and switching between the two would be easy.
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#6
Hello, Markosz and Terry.

The note chart is a matter of semantics. Is the glass half full, or half empty?

Hohner labels their tremolos as four "cells" to one hole: two exhale cells, two inhale cells.
That is so that with the tremolo, the performer may transfer the Richter setup of a blues harp directly to the
Richter tremolo.

On a Hohner tremolo, cells one and two are exhale, and vertically stacked, the same exhale pitch; Cells three
and four are vertically stacked, the same inhale pitch. Cells 1,2,3,4 are in one "hole" (4 cells) on a Hohner.

On most other brands, each pair of vertically stacked cells makes one hole, either exhale or inhale.

The note chart given for the Seydel Fanfare in an earlier post are those of the 2014 Seydel catalog. They are confusing.
They have a few mistakes in the catalog: the Seydel Mountain Harp had one inaccurate note labeling.

So, we'll use a different illustration of the Seydel Fanfare solo system tremolos.

In the following charts, the large letters (C,E,G) are exhale reeds; small letters (d,f,a,b) are inhale reeds.
This will be charted for 3 complete octaves, 24 Seydel "Holes". The sign ( | ) is a hole divider. Seydel's
hole 1 is the first vertical pair of cells on the left.

SEYDEL FANFARE, Key of C, 24 double holes : (All of the Seydel Fanfare models have this setup)

||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C||
||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C||

SEYDEL MOUNTAIN HARP, key of C, 24 double holes:

||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|| (This is only the C side of the 2-sider. The other side is in G)
||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b||

Terry, for your Mountain Harp with 20 double holes each side, the chart ends at cell f on the right side.

Best Regards

John Broecker
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#7
(01-19-2015, 12:36 AM)john_broecker Wrote: Hello, Markosz and Terry.

The note chart is a matter of semantics. Is the glass half full, or half empty?

Hohner labels their tremolos as four "cells" to one hole: two exhale cells, two inhale cells.
That is so that with the tremolo, the performer may transfer the Richter setup of a blues harp directly to the
Richter tremolo.

On a Hohner tremolo, cells one and two are exhale, and vertically stacked, the same exhale pitch; Cells three
and four are vertically stacked, the same inhale pitch. Cells 1,2,3,4 are in one "hole" (4 cells) on a Hohner.

On most other brands, each pair of vertically stacked cells makes one hole, either exhale or inhale.

The note chart given for the Seydel Fanfare in an earlier post are those of the 2014 Seydel catalog. They are confusing.
They have a few mistakes in the catalog: the Seydel Mountain Harp had one inaccurate note labeling.

So, we'll use a different illustration of the Seydel Fanfare solo system tremolos.

In the following charts, the large letters (C,E,G) are exhale reeds; small letters (d,f,a,b) are inhale reeds.
This will be charted for 3 complete octaves, 24 Seydel "Holes". The sign ( | ) is a hole divider. Seydel's
hole 1 is the first vertical pair of cells on the left.

SEYDEL FANFARE, Key of C, 24 double holes : (All of the Seydel Fanfare models have this setup)

||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C||  
||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C||

SEYDEL MOUNTAIN HARP, key of C, 24 double holes:

||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b||  (This is only the C side of the 2-sider. The other side is in G)
||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b||

Terry, for your Mountain Harp with 20 double holes each side, the chart ends at cell f on the right side.

Best Regards

John Broecker


That's it John. That's it. Thanks again. I think I'm taking a liking to Seydel tremolos.

John, with people like me around, you'll never really ever get to fully retire from teaching.

Wishing you the best,

Terry
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#8
(01-19-2015, 12:50 AM)terryg Wrote:
(01-19-2015, 12:36 AM)john_broecker Wrote: Hello, Markosz and Terry.

The note chart is a matter of semantics. Is the glass half full, or half empty?

Hohner labels their tremolos as four "cells" to one hole: two exhale cells, two inhale cells.
That is so that with the tremolo, the performer may transfer the Richter setup of a blues harp directly to the
Richter tremolo.

On a Hohner tremolo, cells one and two are exhale, and vertically stacked, the same exhale pitch; Cells three
and four are vertically stacked, the same inhale pitch. Cells 1,2,3,4 are in one "hole" (4 cells) on a Hohner.

On most other brands, each pair of vertically stacked cells makes one hole, either exhale or inhale.

The note chart given for the Seydel Fanfare in an earlier post are those of the 2014 Seydel catalog. They are confusing.
They have a few mistakes in the catalog: the Seydel Mountain Harp had one inaccurate note labeling.

So, we'll use a different illustration of the Seydel Fanfare solo system tremolos.

In the following charts, the large letters (C,E,G) are exhale reeds; small letters (d,f,a,b) are inhale reeds.
This will be charted for 3 complete octaves, 24 Seydel "Holes". The sign ( | ) is a hole divider. Seydel's
hole 1 is the first vertical pair of cells on the left.

SEYDEL FANFARE, Key of C, 24 double holes : (All of the Seydel Fanfare models have this setup)

||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C||  
||C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C|C|d|E|f|G|a|b|C||

SEYDEL MOUNTAIN HARP, key of C, 24 double holes:

||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b||  (This is only the C side of the 2-sider. The other side is in G)
||C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b|C|d|E|f|G|a|C|b||

Terry, for your Mountain Harp with 20 double holes each side, the chart ends at cell f on the right side.

Best Regards

John Broecker


That's it John.  That's it.  Thanks again.  I think I'm taking a liking to Seydel tremolos.  

John, with people like me around, you'll never really ever get to fully retire from teaching.

Wishing you the best,

Terry
If you're the sort of person, like me, who likes to consume sticky liquids while playing tunes with friends then the valves in the FANFARE may become more trouble than they're worth. Of course one shouldn't consume sticky liquids when playing.  Wink However, I usually have a glass of water as well just to clean the mouth. Smile
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#9
George,

Water, water with a little lemon, and black coffee, that's it for my liquid intake. Very boring huh?
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#10
From what I am reading in some of the posts, if a novice like me, who has never played a chromatic harmoncia, should not even give the Fanfare consideration. Would this be a true statement, or since I am a novice, just go with it, since I don't know better, if I want one, and blow and draw away like crazy
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