Tab Chart
#1
Here is a chart that shows where Richter blues harp tab would fall on an Asian system tremolo harp. It works for 21 or 24 note models. If you find mistakes let me know and I will correct it. If you have any questions ask them in this thread. The tab numbers are Richter tab. They are located on a grid that represents the tremolo harp. Blow notes are shown in the top row and draw notes in the bottom row but of course each is found in each row. So below 5 is another 5 blow note. Above -5 is another -5 draw note.
The row below the chart is the actual note names on a C harp.

JEB, if you think this chart is useful feel free to post it anywhere on your site. It is my own work and I grant permission for anyone to share it.


.pdf   Richter tab on Tremolo Harmonica 8-2-15 RG.pdf (Size: 31.22 KB / Downloads: 36)

There are thousands of Richter tabs at sites like harptabs.com. This chart will allow you to play those tabs on a 21 or 24 note tremolo.
Also see post below from 8-25-15 for another version of this pdf.
Reply
#2
A Google search will turn up thousands of Richter tabs. Here are some examples:

http://www.volcano.net/~jackmearl/featured.html

https://www.harptabs.com/ (over 20,000 tabs there!)

http://www.wildflowerharmonica.com/tabs/

http://www.harmonica.com/harmonica-tabs-...28144.html

There are two things to be careful of with Richter harp tabs. First, some of them are not accurate. Some will sound bad on a tremolo because they will sound bad on Richter because they are simply wrong. Anybody can make a tab and so some have mistakes. Second, some use bent notes that are not on the tremolo. Some of the bent Richter notes are found on the tremolo (-3" for instance) but not all of them (-4' for instance, unless you use single reed bends).
I used tabs to learn the Richter 14 years ago so I know how helpful they are to beginners. I hope those tabs with my chart will help tremolo beginners.
Reply
#3
That's amazing Rex. Tremendous list of songs. The strange thing is, and I guess it is strange, as I have come along this year, I don't really give it much mind if a song is in Richter, Solo, or any other way. Now I just hear the tune and if I like it I can learn to play. I am very very happy about this development.

As I have told you before, you're pretty dog gone amazing Rex. Seriously.
Reply
#4
Well, Terry, when you are new to something people who have "been around the block a few times" seem to know a lot, or be "amazing". LOL As you stated in your comment, you no longer think about the layout, you just play. And you have been at it for less than a year.
Much of what I post is for the brand new player. I do not download tab and transfer it to the tremolo to learn a song. I just pick up the harp and start playing. That is one of the great things about the harmonica, it is a great "play by ear" instrument. When I first started learning the "blues harp" simple diagrams and tabs and scales really helped me get up to speed. But soon you take off the training wheels. Other people provided that info for me about 14 years ago. Putting out some info on the tremolo is my way of paying it forward. The nice emails I get through Google + from beginners is why I kept doing it. But I'm about done now. I do still want to get those reed frequencies listed, but that is for me so I can tweak my own harps.
Reply
#5
Well, Rex , the chart is for beginners. Actually all you did was name the notes on each hole for a C harp diatonic. Well yes, useful for Tremlo players who have not played the diatonic and so don't know the notes. Now knowing the note names of the tabbed song they can look up the note on their Tremlo. Handy because Tremlos have differing layouts.
Good you showed the Blues bent notes, but you could have also named the unbent notes. eg. holes 2 & 3 G &B because lots of tabbed pieces are not all Blues.. The Tremlo transfer needs the player to understand the Diatonic notes only cover 1 octave whereas they have usually 3 octaves.
So, Rex, it could be a useful chart for Tramlo beginners. I doubt I would need to use it. Good effort. Smile
But why not do a bigger chart using all the bent notes and standard notes. If you are doing a chart to help beginners, do something really worthwhile. Idea
Reply
#6
(08-03-2015, 11:16 PM)Rex Wrote: Well, Terry, when you are new to something people who have "been around the block a few times" seem to know a lot, or be "amazing". LOL As you stated in your comment, you no longer think about the layout, you just play. And you have been at it for less than a year.
Much of what I post is for the brand new player. I do not download tab and transfer it to the tremolo to learn a song. I just pick up the harp and start playing. That is one of the great things about the harmonica, it is a great "play by ear" instrument. When I first started learning the "blues harp" simple diagrams and tabs and scales really helped me get up to speed. But soon you take off the training wheels. Other people provided that info for me about 14 years ago. Putting out some info on the tremolo is my way of paying it forward. The nice emails I get through Google + from beginners is why I kept doing it. But I'm about done now. I do still want to get those reed frequencies listed, but that is for me so I can tweak my own harps.


The truth and nothing but the truth: Rex, you have PAID FORWARD. When I first start, sometime back in Nov., I found three friends who seemed to delight in answering my questions. I just knew you guys would tire of me, but never once did you seem "put out".

My three (3) new friends: Rex, Jonathan (JEB), and John (JB). Of course, many new friends came later, with the creation of this forum.
Reply
#7
(08-04-2015, 07:08 AM)dezzy Wrote: Well, Rex , the chart is for beginners. Actually all you did was name the notes on each hole for a C harp diatonic. Well yes, useful for Tremlo players who have not played the diatonic and so don't know the notes. Now knowing the note names of the tabbed song they can look up the note on their Tremlo. Handy because Tremlos have differing layouts.
Good you showed the Blues bent notes, but you could have also named the unbent notes. eg. holes 2 & 3 G &B because lots of tabbed pieces are not all Blues.. The Tremlo transfer needs the player to understand the Diatonic notes only cover 1 octave whereas they have usually 3 octaves.
So, Rex, it could be a useful chart for Tramlo beginners. I doubt I would need to use it. Good effort. Smile  
But why not do a bigger chart using all the bent notes and standard notes. If you are doing a chart to help beginners, do something really worthwhile. Idea

Hi Dezzy,
I started to expand that chart with more whistles and bells but then decided not to. There was plenty of room below the chart and I actually put a Richter harp there. I deleted the extra info from the final version. This was intended for beginners and I did not wish to confuse them with extra information. The chart has one purpose, to allow somebody to play Richter harp tab on an Asian system tremolo. Once they learn a few tunes they will most usually abandon tabs. I did show the Richter bends that are available as unbent notes on the tremolo (-2' and -3" on the 21 and 24 and +10' on the 24). Bending on the tremolo is an advanced technique so tremolo bends were left out. I decided simpler was better in this case. People who would understand the extra information would probably not use or need such a chart.
I do appreciate your input. If you (or anyone) would want to add to the chart I have the option of allowing others to edit it at the Google Sheets site. Right now I'm the only one with access to the edit function. Once you edit it you can then download it as a pdf. I already have the pdf I wanted and have shared it here so if you change or add to my chart it matters not to me. Or you can start another chart. Just let me know if you want access to the edit function (or anyone else here do likewise). The site is actually for making and sharing spreadsheets.
Peace,
Rex
Reply
#8
Here is the chart updated. I have added a row at the top with actual hole numbers. It goes 1 to 21 for a 21 note. I labeled the first hole on a 24 as 0 because it is easier for me to think of the 24 as an extended 21. If you want the first hole on your 24 to be 1 then add 1 to each of the other numbers. You can do that in a row below the chart after printing.
.pdf   Richter tab on Tremolo Harmonica - Sheet1 (3) (1).pdf (Size: 31.62 KB / Downloads: 18)
Reply
#9
Hello, Rex and Dezzy, and Terry G.

Rex: Thanks for your tremolo charts.
We understand the difficulties involved
in tabbing for tremolo harps.

We've discussed this before. There are
many tremolo harmonica tab systems,
3 standard reed placements, many
different amounts of holes, and on and on.

Then, there are double, triple, quads and sextets,
each harp in a different key; different scales
(major, minor, custom); etc.

The fact that Rex has taken his valuable time to
chart a tab for converting Richter to Asian systems
is commendable.

Also, Rex's suggestion that we should learn by ear
rather than tabs, is common sense. Why learn a tab
to a song, then re-tab for another harmonica? Get a
recording of the tune, listen to the tune, find it's key,
and play it. If the tune has notes not in the key of
the harp, use a different harp.

Since most of us are self-taught tremolo harpers,
learning by ear (rote learning) is the quickest
way to learn a tune, after you've mastered ear training.

Skip the tabs and sheet music, go directly to the music.

A few of us have backgrounds in other musical instruments,
and are trained in reading traditional notation. This is by far
the best and quickest way to learn a new tune, if you've
mastered note reading.

It's an opinion that the manufacturers should offer
fewer choices in tremolo harps, and standardize the
tab systems. As it is today, the manufacturers are
discouraging starters from learning the tremolo harps.
Too many rules, too many exceptions, too many tabs.

Best Regards

John Broecker
Reply
#10
Let me congratulate you Rex on this chart you make supreme job this is extremely well done great tool thank you
Reply



Website Security Test